Jason Truesdell : Pursuing My Passions

A life in flux. Soon to be immigrant to Japan. Recently migrated this blog from another platform after many years of neglect (about March 6, 2017). Sorry for the styling and functionality potholes; I am working on cleaning things up and making it usable again.

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re: Chestnut focaccia

I have never seen chestnut flour. Where do you get it? Is it the same chestnut used in stir-fry?

Suganya

re: Chestnut focaccia

I found chestnut flour at my local Italian-ish market in the Pike Place Market, but I'm sure it's available in a few other places. I usually associate chestnuts with the fall because that's when chestnuts ripen, but I figured that it would be fun to play with the flour a bit.

It's actually made from chestnuts, not "water chestnuts", a different vegetable entirely. However, water chestnut flour exists also; if you are going to find that in the US, I suspect it would be at a Chinese market. That would probably be used for slightly gelatinous, soft, translucent boiled cakes.

jason

re: Chestnut focaccia

How stupid of me!! Now I know what are you talking abt. Thanks for the info :)

Suganya

re: Chestnut focaccia

My chin nearly hit the table when I saw baked goods from a Seattlite this week. I was considering doing a post on mugicha, as that's been the only thing appealing to me in this heat (and I laughed when I saw Molly's post on lemonade).

I spent the day in the coolest corner of the house, with a giant fan and a jug of cold tea. It reminded me of Japan in August though, that's the last time I was so heat-cranky. So happy to wake up to coolness the next morning.

Tea

re: Chestnut focaccia

Yes, no baked goods for me this week, at least not of the homemade variety... I've certainly grabbed my share of coffee and pastry in the morning at Belle Epicurean or Caffe Migliore, but my oven languished the entire week.

I've had mugicha in the refrigerator since the first warm day of the season. I'm just using the broken instant stuff that can be cold-infused for a few hours in the refrigerator: it comes in a big brick of little teabags, but it does the trick on a hot day. On occasion I remember to bring back some of the whole roasted mugi when coming back from Japan, and do the more tedious boiling, cooling and refrigerating. The flavor is more complex, but sometimes I just need the cold liquid. This week was like that.

jason